What’s your sports personality?
Badminton coaching / Psychology / sports psychology

What’s your sports personality?

Sports can reveal a lot about somebody’s personality. Famous tennis coach Vic Braden came up with a way to analyse the “brain types” of his players, based loosely on the Myers Briggs Type Indicator. He identified that Roger Federer is an “NT,” an Intuitive Thinker. This enabled him to tailor his coaching style to suit the type who likes solutions, … Continue reading

Winners and losers in a tournament
sports psychology / Tournaments

Winners and losers in a tournament

  What makes a good tournament? Organisational management has a big impact on the final outcome. Consistent rules and scoring system, as well as fair play, are important in determining who wins the trophy.   There have been weekly badminton competitions in Sydney over the last month, hosted by different organisers for different purposes. They’re … Continue reading

The line between gamesmanship and cheating
sports psychology / Tournaments

The line between gamesmanship and cheating

Competition in sports often involves deception, manoeuvring and exploiting an opponent’s weaknesses. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the desire to win drives players to use whatever means possible. It’s perhaps understandable that pressure and a win-at-all-costs mentality motivates competitors to use gamesmanship tactics.   What is gamesmanship? Gamesmanship can be broadly defined as “the practice of winning games without actually violating rules“. Gamesmanship includes practices used in a … Continue reading

sports psychology / Tournaments

Wasting time and delays in a match

Delays and time-wasting in a competition happens in sports like football, hockey and tennis. There are legitimate reasons for players to stop playing, but at other times it’s a strategic ploy to disrupt the flow and tempo of a game. Undue delays can be used as a psychological tactic to break an opponent’s rhythm.  Although there are times when acute injuries require medical assistance (such … Continue reading

Shouting during play is unfair and a bad image for badminton
Badminton / Psychology / sports psychology / Tournaments

Shouting during play is unfair and a bad image for badminton

  Players who shout or grunt when they hit the shuttlecock can gain an unfair advantage. Their shouts can interfere with their opponent’s game, either masking the sound of the shuttlecock being hit by the racquet or distracting their opponent. At least two studies of grunting have found that players who grunt or shriek gain a few advantages over their quieter opponents: They hit … Continue reading