What’s your sports personality?
Badminton coaching / Psychology / sports psychology

What’s your sports personality?

Sports can reveal a lot about somebody’s personality. Famous tennis coach Vic Braden came up with a way to analyse the “brain types” of his players, based loosely on the Myers Briggs Type Indicator. He identified that Roger Federer is an “NT,” an Intuitive Thinker. This enabled him to tailor his coaching style to suit the type who likes solutions, … Continue reading

The line between gamesmanship and cheating
sports psychology / Tournaments

The line between gamesmanship and cheating

Competition in sports often involves deception, manoeuvring and exploiting an opponent’s weaknesses. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the desire to win drives players to use whatever means possible. It’s perhaps understandable that pressure and a win-at-all-costs mentality motivates competitors to use gamesmanship tactics.   What is gamesmanship? Gamesmanship can be broadly defined as “the practice of winning games without actually violating rules“. Gamesmanship includes practices used in a … Continue reading

How (not) to play badminton with injuries
Badminton injuries

How (not) to play badminton with injuries

  For recreational players with a badminton-related injury, the desire to go on court often overrides common-sense. When I talk to players, the most common badminton injuries involve the achilles, ankles, knees or rotator cuff. Clearly, playing for long periods or more intensively can risk aggravating those injuries. So I wondered, how do you assess whether you should play or … Continue reading

Facing those inevitable off days
Badminton / sports psychology

Facing those inevitable off days

Everybody has good and bad days. When you’re in good form, play feels natural and the game is awesome. But even pros admit they don’t always play their best every time. The strongest players overcome this adversity well. Here are are a few simple suggestions to salvage a match when your performance isn’t 100%. Check your timing. Much of the time it’s down to poor timing. Watch the … Continue reading